Previous Events

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Presentations from 2017

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November 2017: Gabriel Diaz Maggioli: Developing oracy skills in the classroom

Date: Sunday, November 12
Time: 1.15pm – 3.15pm
Location: Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP
Details: In collaboration with this year’s JALT International conference and Soka University, we’re inviting plenary speaker Gabriel Diaz Maggioli. For reference, here is his IATEFL plenary from earlier this year.
Slides: Link
Abstract: The development of oracy skills is generally cited as one of the difficulties that English language teachers experience. In this workshop we will explore various tried and tested techniques that get students talking…and talking…and talking. Come to this workshop and learn a variety of techniques to help boost your learners’ oral expression. No matter what level we teach, we are generally confronted with silence whenever we introduce a speaking class. In this session, I will attempt to present a series of techniques that help learners activate their passive knowledge of the language so that they can express themselves orally both with fluency and with accuracy. The techniques range from controlled to free so that they can be usefully applied not just to the development of oracy skills, but also to the development of language as a whole.

Bio: Gabriel Diaz Maggioli is a teacher who applies the lessons learned in the classroom to his roles as teacher educator, researcher and author. His area of research is the application of Sociocultural Learning Theory to the field of teacher learning. Gabriel has authored, and co-authored, 28 books ranging from coursebooks to reference books, as well as numerous academic articles. He has shared his theories and praxis with colleagues in the Americas, the Middle East, Europe and Asia. Gabriel also works as a consultant for international agencies such as the European Union, UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the US Department of State, and The World Bank. He currently lives and works in Uruguay, where he is Tenured Professor of TESOL Methods at the National Teacher Education College, and Director of the MATESOL Program at CLAEH University.

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October 2017: Young Learners – Lesley Ito and Hitomi Sakamoto

Date: Sunday October 22
Time: 1pm-4.30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Lesley Ito: Experience the Power of CLIL Lessons for Young Learners!
Abstract: CLIL ELT lessons combine English with other subjects to interest and motivate young learners and give them a chance to use the English they have learned in a real context. These types of lessons are quite common in ESL classes throughout Europe, but are rare in EFL classes in Japan. The presenter was so inspired by what her colleagues in Europe were doing that she created an entire pre-school/elementary cross-curricular program called the Double Ring Lesson for her school, BIG BOW English Lab in Nagoya. Several classroom-tested EFL CLIL lessons will be demonstrated in this interactive workshop. An explanation on how these types of lessons can be made appropriate for the EFL class will be given. See how these types of lessons can invigorate your EFL program!

Bio: Lesley Ito is a well-known teacher, teacher trainer, school owner, owner of LIXON Education, and award winning materials writer based in Nagoya. Her school, BIG BOW English Lab, has a CLIL curriculum with a strong focus on literacy. Her ELT writing credits include teacher’s guides for the We Can! series (McGraw-Hill), workbooks for the Our World and Welcome to Our World series (Cengage), online support materials for Choose Your Own Adventure (McGraw-Hill) and Let’s Chant, Let’s Sing, Greatest Hits (OUP), a book on teaching, Fifty Ways to Teach Young Learners (Wayzgoose Press), and the interactive graded readers Tornado Alley and Backstage Pass (Atama iiBooks).

Hitomi Sakamoto: “Global Greenglish Project”
Abstract: The presenter has been promoting an intercultural exchange project between Fukushima children and Turkish children for two years. The students learn about environment in English classes and that is why it is called “Greenglish”. The syllabus and some activities including a song are to be introduced.

Bio: Hitomi Sakamoto is a professor at Toyo Gakuen University and director of the English Education Development Center. Her research interests include global education in EFL classes and methods for teaching English to young learners. She is a co-author of an English textbook your world.
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September 2017: ESP Symposium

Date: Saturday, 16 September 2017
Time: 10:00am – 6:00pm
Location: Keio University
Details:
In September, instead of holding our own event, we are co-sponsoring a plenary speaker at the CUE/Business Communication SIG’s event in Keio University: the ESP Symposium will feature three plenary speakers, two from overseas, and one from within Japan, with a broad of expertise in the field of teaching and researching English for Specific Purposes (ESP). Additionally, two poster sessions, a round-table and panel discussion offer teacher-researchers opportunity to interact and share their own work in ESP. There will be a call for posters in February. Additional details as they come in here: link

Fee for JALT members: 1,500
Fee for one-day members: 3,000 yen
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July 2017: Dr. Stephen Ryan – Motivation research: What does it have to say to teachers in Japan?

Date: Sunday, July 23
Time: 1pm-16:30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Abstract: The last 15 years or so have witnessed a huge surge in interest in language learner motivation (Boo, Dornyei, & Ryan, 2015), both theoretical and practical. In the first part of this talk, I intend to take stock of those recent theoretical developments, with a particular focus on the concept that has been key to this growth, Dörnyei’s L2 Motivational Self System (Dörnyei, 2005; 2009). Following on from this theoretical overview, I hope to discuss some of the practical implications of the theoretical shift, exploring how the new thinking applies to learning and teaching in Japanese classrooms.

Discussion leader for this session: Kay Irie

Bio: Stephen Ryan has been involved in language education for over 25 years, with most of that time being spent in Japan. His research and publications cover various aspects of psychology in language learning and he is currently a professor in the School of Culture, Media and Society at Waseda University.

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June 2017: Literature in Language Teaching

Presenters: Paul Hullah, Quenby Hoffman Aoki, Jane Joritz-Nakagawa
Date: Saturday, June 24
Time: 13:00
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Details:
1) Paul Hullah: Poetry As Life And Linguistic Empowerment: But… How Do You Teach It?
Abstract: Hullah defines a ‘literary’ text as language we wish to remember not only for what it expresses, but also for how it expresses it. The rhetorical success or failure of such texts — epitomized by poetry, but present in many other forms and media — relies upon emotive-persuasive potencies of the language of which they are composed. Hullah will cite examples alongside qualitative and quantitative evidence to demonstrate that judiciously selected and properly presented literary texts constitute user-friendly ready-made ELT materials that need never be ‘too difficult’ or ‘too obscure’ for L2 learners of any level.

Hullah will argue that poetry meaningfully foregrounds and highlights the multifold expressive possibilities of language. Poetry is, moreover, frequently lexically ‘self-scaffolding’ (setting up punch lines and/or favoring memory-aiding ‘literary’ devices such as anaphora and repetition), so a closer acquaintance with literary texts can empower learners in terms of linguistic competence and communicative confidence. Research findings appear to uphold this argument.

Literary texts stimulate critical thinking, discourage dogma and encourage active learner engagement. Appropriately taught, they are personally and variously interpretable, inviting a reciprocal import/export of insight and opinion. And sometimes parts of them might not please us or even make much sense. In short, vibrant and varied, linguistically and semantically open and ambiguous, literary texts mirror life.

Notoriously digressive, today Hullah promises not to forget what most teachers really want to know: Practically speaking, exactly how can I use a poem effectively in my own classroom?

Bio:Associate Professor of British Poetry & Culture at Meiji Gakuin University, Paul Hullah was co-founder of Liberlit, the international conference forum for ‘Discussion and Defence of the Role of Literary Texts in the English Curriculum’ . He has published 14 EFL textbooks (all featuring ‘literary’ texts at their core), 7 volumes of poetry, and 4 books of literary criticism. In 2013 he received the Asia Pacific Brand Laureate International Personality Award for ‘paramount contribution to the cultivation of literature [that has] exceptionally restored the appreciation of poetry and contributed to the education of students in Asia.’ Wikipedia

2) Quenby Hoffman Aoki: Coffee, Coyotes, and Creation: Oral Tradition and Modern Society in the Poetry of Native American Writers

Abstract: Native Americans play an important role in the history and cultural identity of the United States, but are often overlooked in literature and English language classrooms. Although the indigenous population was decimated due to five centuries of colonization, they have by no means disappeared. Native cultures are a diverse, vital part of U.S. society, and students in the U.S. and abroad deserve to know more about them than the stereotypes shown in Hollywood movies, advertising, and culturally-appropriated fashion. It must be emphasized that, while works by American Indian authors often draw upon the oral traditions of their people, these writers do live in the modern world: working, teaching, and, most relevant for teachers, writing. This interactive presentation focuses on the poetry of Leslie Marmon Silko (Laguna Pueblo), best known for her novels including Ceremony and Almanac of the Dead, and Luci Tapahonso, first Poet Laureate of the Navajo Nation.

Bio: Quenby Hoffman Aoki holds degrees in Japanese Language and TESOL, and teaches in the English Literature Department at Sophia University. She includes fluency practice and social justice issues, especially gender and race, in her classes, along with (of course) literature. She is recently remembering a lot of Spanish vocabulary, after being distracted by Japan for 26 years.

3) Jane Joritz-Nakagawa: Gender, disability and literature

Abstract: What images, thoughts and feelings do you have when you hear the word “gender”? “Disability”? Is there any connection between the two? Are gender and disability appropriate themes for the classroom?In this presentation we will look briefly at some stereotypes and myths of gender and disability, as well as look at works of literature which have gender and/or disability as a major theme. Finally as time allows we will discuss some teaching techniques and activities for using literary works presented.

Bio:
Jane Joritz-Nakagawa has over 25 years of teaching experience, nearly all of it in Japan. In the 1990s she studied cooperative learning in order to better her teaching. Since then her major research interest has been feminism and literature. She is a very widely published poet whose ninth full length poetry collection is forthcoming in 2017 with Theenk Books (USA) as is an anthology of adventurous poetry and essays by women living in a country other than that of their birth titled “women: poetry: migration [an anthology]”.

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May 2017: Learning Outside schools

Presenters: Dawn Lucovich, Michael Ellis, & Amy Holdsworth
Date:
Sunday May 14
Time: 1pm-4.45pm
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan, Dai1 Kenshu-shitsu. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP
Details:

Presentation #1: Using linguistic landscape projects for language learners
Language learners must attend to language in order to facilitate acquisition (Schmidt, 1990, 2001, 2010). However, EFL learners do not always attend to instances of the target language in their environment. Linguistic landscape (LL) research investigates the usage of language on signs in public spaces (Landry & Bourhis, 1997), and may be one method to create attention to and engagement with English. This interactive workshop will introduce the components of an LL project and resources for planning a project, then allow participants to classify sample LL data and draw some preliminary conclusions. Finally, LL project specifications adaptable for students of various levels will be discussed.

Bio: Dawn Lucovich is the current President of Tokyo JALT and a Ph.D.candidate at Temple University. She currently works in the Department of Literature and Culture at Tokyo Woman’s Christian University. Her other research interests include assessment and vocabulary, discourse communities, and writing center practices.

Presentation #2 Project Based Learning (PBL) Across the Pacific
The benefits of Project Based Learning (PBL) include increased studentengagement, the promotion of critical thinking and learner autonomy (Thomas, 2000), and authentic opportunities for communicative language use both in and outside the classroom (Barron & Darling-Hammond, 2008).The presenter will introduce a structured research project in which Japanese high school EFL students designed and exchanged surveys on topics of their choice with American 8th-grade students using Google Forms. The Japanese students analyzed and summarized their data in videos, which they then used to teach their findings to their classmates. Working with the American students provided the Japanese students with more chances to use English, and broadened the focus of their research. Each step of the two-month project will be explained and evaluated, from brainstorming topics and forming research questions, to the peer-taught mini lessons and final assessment. Based on student learning outcomes and reflective feedback, the presenter will offer practical advice for teachers interested in setting up similar projects in their own classes.

Bio: Michael Ellis is the EFL program coordinator at International Christian University High School. He is interested in teachers’ reflective practice (among many other topics), and is currently program chair of the JALT Teacher Development SIG.

Presentation #3 Writing Outside the Classroom: The Daily Discipline of Writing
The Daily Discipline of Writing (Callahan) is an activity designed for implementation outside the classroom and is used to encourage student fluidity, voice, and expression minus the inner critic (Elbow 1994) and external assessor. As the DDW is not read by the teacher, it allows students to take risks and experiment without fear of under performing, and simultaneously allows students more opportunities to write without the teacher acting as “bottleneck” (Moffett 1968). The rationale behind using the DDW, its intended benefits, and several options for its assessment will be discussed.

Bio: Amy Holdsworth is in the returnee department of Shibuya Kyoiku Gakuen (Shibuya Junior and Senior High), where she teaches Language Arts and World History. She is a graduate of Teachers College, Columbia University, and has most recently contributed to 東大英語リスニング. She is interested in pedagogical strategies for returnee/liminal classrooms, student voice and agency, and expanding the literary canon.
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April 2017: Social in Kannai

Date: April 22
Time: From 5pm
Location: “Esperanza” Mexican restaurant in Kannai (opposite Baird Beer)
Details:
At 5pm, meet at the Mexican restaurant “Esperanza”. The restaurant is minutes from Sakuragicho, Kannai, and Bashamichi, near our Kannai Hall venue (map)

We plan to escape before the mariachi guitar starts playing and makes conversation impossible at around 8pm, after which there is likely to be a short nijikai in the Bashamichi taproom, which is just across the road (map).

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Malc (yojaltpresident@yojalt.org) before April 1st.
If you get lost on the day, call 08054781495

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January 2017: Tech@Tamagawa

Presenter: You!
Date: Sunday, January 22
Time: 1.15pm-5pm, followed by food and drink near Tamagawagakuenmae Station
Location: Tamagawa University, ELF Study Hall Room 301. Nearest to Tamagawagakuenmae Station (Odakyu Line) MAP: http://www.tamagawa.jp/en/access/

Details:
If you would like to present, please prepare a 10-15 minute presentation sharing the practical application of technology for language learning – an activity, some materials, an app or website – anything other members might find useful. To book a slot, please email Brett Milliner bmilliner@gmail.com with a 50-100 word abstract and a title. If there is time at the end, it may be possible to squeeze in a few walk-in speakers, but to avoid disappointment please reserve early.
After the meeting, we will head out for some food and drink near Tamagawagakuenmae Station!
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February/March 2017:

No event

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Presentations from 2016

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December 2016: My Share

Date: Sunday, December 11
Presenter: You!
Time: 1.15pm-5pm, followed by Bonenkai
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP

Details: Details: If you would like to present, please prepare a 10-15 minute presentation (or poster presentation) on a practical teaching topic – an activity, some materials, an app or website – anything other members might find useful. To book a slot, please email yojaltpresident@yojalt.org with a 50-100 word abstract and a title. If there is time at the end, it may be possible to squeeze in a few walk-in speakers, but to avoid disappointment please reserve early. After the meeting, we will head out in the area for some food and drink!

Line up:
Darin Schneider: Create a Conclusion Paragraph
Koki Tomita: Scaffolding Vocabulary for Coaching Baseball Defense
Maho Sano: Synthesis of Learning: A Group Project in a TOEIC Preparation Course
Paul Nehls: English for bargaining
Terry Yearley: Oral fluency
Forrest Nelson: TED, Quizlet, and Moodle
Paul Raine: Latest update to Apps 4 EFL
David Ockert: Self-determination based lesson plans
Frederick Bacala: Using Taleblazer Game for First Day Activity
Kevin Trainor: Content – based instruction for high school
David Hough: Teaching about Indigenous Peoples
Kishiko Nashimoto: Seating arrangements and how to check students’ homework.
Gareth Barnes: Student narratives and possible selves

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October 2016: Curtis Kelly and Leander Hughes

Date: October 22 (SATURDAY)
Time: from 1pm
Location:Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP
Details:
1) Curtis Kelly – Why our Brains Like Stories

Abstract: Stories, the original Wikipedia, are the oldest tool of teaching, and still the most potent. For most of human existence, we have used stories to share information and educate our offspring about the wiles of the world. It is no wonder our brains have evolved to process stories so much more effectively than other formats of delivery. In fact, stories do more than information transfer. They cause a parallel activation of the insula that results in brain linking. The presenter will provide the neuroscience behind stories, methods for using them, and some powerful stories for you to experiment with.

Bio: Dr. Curtis Kelly’s life mission is to reduce the suffering of the classroom. He has written over 30 books in the attempt to do so, including Active Skills for Communication (Cengage), Writing from Within (Cambridge), and Significant Scribbles (Longman).

2) Leander Hughes – Applying Principles of Positive Psychology in the Language Classroom
Abstract: Want to help your students become happier and more productive and maybe even learn English more effectively along the way? New findings in positive psychology—the science of self-betterment—may provide the tools for us to do this. Leander will introduce a number of such tools, some of which can be put into practice in the classroom with very little effort or preparation. Join Leander to learn more about techniques for creating new positive habits, improving relationships, solving problems with the unconscious mind, and much more. Audience members will be encouraged to discuss and share their own ideas during the presentation for how to adapt these techniques to their own context or apply the principles they are based on in different ways.

Bio: Leander Hughes is an associate professor at the Saitama University Center for English Education and Development. He is interested in finding more effective ways to teach and learn languages.

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September 2016: Global Issues in Language Education

Date: September 17

Time: 1pm

Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map

Details:
1) Mark Shrosbee will discuss Environmental Issues in the Classroom
2) Sarah Sanderson Doyle will introduce teaching for global citizenship: understanding and using the Global Peace Index (GPI) in the language classroom as a tool for critical thinking and international awareness
3) Yuri Hosoda & David Aline will be share their research on Examining How Japanese University Students Open Up Arguments in Classroom Discussion Tasks
In this conversation analytic study we examine how second language learners construct arguments in task-based language learning discussion tasks. Analysis focused on the opening sequences, positions, and strategies deployed for building arguments. Data consist of 165 hours of video-recorded small-group discussions in university English classes. A fine-grained analysis revealed that potential opposers delay initiating opposition through various strategies, such as: (a) Wh-questions and repeats that foreshadow opposition, and (b) waiting for the original discussant to provide more information before initiating opposition. The results expand our understanding of resources that second language speakers make use of to initiate arguments during formal discussions. Finally, some teaching implications and suggestions for curriculum design are discussed.
Bios:
Mark Shrosbree teaches at Tokai University in Kanagawa. His interests include course design, methodology, and materials development, for both general EFL courses and English for Specific Purposes. He maintains his university materials bank, as well as a Moodle page for the global issues course he teaches.
Sarah Sanderson Doyle is a Global Peace Index Ambassador and a Rotary International Peace Fellow completing an M.A. in Peace Studies at International Christian University in Tokyo. Her research concerns global issues in language education, peace education and second language acquisition.
Yuri Hosoda, EdD from Temple University, is currently a professor in the Faculty of Foreign Languages and the Graduate School of Foreign Languages at Kanagawa University, Yokohama. Her research examines second language use and learning in Japanese and English at university and mundane conversation through a conversation analytic perspective.
David Aline, EdD from Temple University, is a professor at Kanagawa University, Yokohama, Faculty of Foreign Languages, and teaches psycholinguistics in the Graduate School of Foreign Languages. His research interests include second language acquisition and use in university, lingua franca, and tutorial settings through a conversation analytic perspective

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July 2016: Doing survey research: How to design, analyse, and write up research using questionnaires

Date: Saturday, July 23
Presenter: David Ockert
Time: 1.15pm
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP
Abstract: The presenter will explain how to conduct primary research by explaining how to develop, pilot test, administer, and analyze the data from a substantive scale survey instrument for research purposes. A substantive scale uses questions and a scale system (e.g. a Likert scale) to gather data for analysis. This presentation will follow the outline of a research paper and the sections are explained using the author’s own research project to measure student (N = 104) motivation. The presenter hopes that attendees will gain an understanding of the research process, including key terms and definitions, and proceed with greater confidence to design their own research projects and report the results.
Bio: David Ockert has a M.Ed. from Temple University and a Level 2 JLPT certificate. He presently works for Toyo University. His research interests are in CLT, TBLT, CALL, motivation and student affect and self-determination theory in educational contexts.
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June 2016: Posters!

Date: Saturday June 18th
Time: from 1.15pm
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP

Our June event has moved to July, which opens up June 18th, and we’ve decided to try a new kind of event – a poster session.
We are looking for three kinds of posters:
1) Recycled posters. Show your old poster some love! You put a lot of work into it, but since that conference it’s been sitting in its tube gathering dust. Let it shine again – bring it along. You can give a verbal update on what you’ve done since.
2) Preview posters. Have a poster presentation coming up over the summer? Bring along your draft poster, and get some feedback on how to make it clearer and more likely to attract viewers.
3) First ever posters. Never done a poster before? Try one! As with preview posters, you’ll be able to get lots of feedback on formatting/printing/organization, to help you confidently apply for a poster presentation at a large conference.

Details
Size: We’ll be ready for posters up to A0 size, but smaller is OK.

Format: Posters of the “A4 paper stuck to larger colored sheet” style are also welcome, but note that these are less commonly seen at larger conferences, and if you’re doing a new poster, this is your chance to practice putting together and finding a way to print the standard style poster. If this is your first time, I would recommend using a single large PowerPoint and getting it printed by your school (as opposed to Kinkos which could be pricy). If you use images, try to get high resolution versions, or take your screenshots on a large screen to make sure they scale up. There is a good overview on best practice here.

Session pattern: We’ll be putting up 3-4 posters at a time, with the timing depending on how many applications we get. There will also be plenty of time to talk to the other attendees, which is something we don’t get at normal meetings, where we’re often a little rushed at the end. Afterwards, as always, we’ll be going out for some food and drinks in Sakuragicho.

If you would like to present, please send a quick mail saying “I’m in!” to yojaltpresident@yojalt.org, with your name and a title.

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June 2016: Sponsored speaker at CALL & the Brain

Yokohama Chapter is sponsoring a plenary speaker at this year’s CALL conference

Speaker: Julia Volkman
Title: Mind, Brain, and Education: Uniting Neuroscience and Educational Practice
Date: June 3-5, 2016
Venue: Tamagawa University
Details on conference:  here
Details on session: here

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May: Activities and Movement

Date: May 15 (SUNDAY)
Time: 1pm-4.45pm
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan Dai2 Kenshushitsu(第二研修室)(1F). Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP
Details:

Let’s get physical – The brain/body connection in the EFL classroom (2 hrs)
Presenter: Marc Helgesen
Abstracts: When we sit for 20 minutes, blood flows downward to the feet and legs. Standing and moving for just one minute triggers a 15% increase of blood (and therefore oxygen) to the brain. That’s one reason to get students up and out of their seats regularly. There are many more. This session will look at brain-science reasons and ways to have students moving their bodies, while moving their English abilities up at the same time.
Bio: Marc Helgesen is professor in the Department of Intercultural Studies and the Department of Modern Business at Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Sendai. He’s author of over 150 professional articles, books and textbooks including the English Firsthand series. He has been an invited or featured speaker at conferences on five continents. He maintains websites at www.ELTandHappiness.com and www.HelgesenHandouts.weebly.com
Handout link: here

Developing and Choosing Educational Games and Fun Activities in the Classroom
Presenter: David Chapman (90 mins)
Abstract: This workshop will focus on using tools available to teachers such as Bloom’s Taxonomy and scaffolding to help teachers choose rewarding and worthwhile activities and games in the classroom. Fundamentals behind games will be discussed so that teachers can make a more informed decisions about whether the fun activities that they are considering will help accomplish educational goals they have set out for their students or not. Strategies on how to more effectively use games and fun activities in the classroom and beyond with also be discussed.
Bio: David Chapman teaches at The Junior High School Affiliated with Japan Women’s University 日本女子大学附属中学校 and J.F. Oberlin University. He has been teaching in Japan for over 18 years. He has a Master’s Degree in TEFOL and is working on his teaching certification in the U.S. His research interests include educational games in and out of the classroom.

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January, 2016: Labour Issues for Language Teachers

Date: January 17 (Sunday)
Time: 1pm-16:30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Details: The presenters will talk about the advantages of being a member of a union, the legal rights and obligations of employees under Japanese law, and give examples and cases from their experience as organisers to illustrate the issues, including the five-year contract rule. There will be a question and answer session at the end.
Bio: Tozen Union (Zenkoku Ippan Tokyo General Union) is a multiethnic, multicultural, nationwide labor union based in Tokyo. Members hail from over 15 countries working in a diverse range of workplaces including language education, financial services, and industrial warehousing and shipping. Tozen is a democratic organization dedicated to improving the working conditions of its members. Gerome Rothman is Field Director and an Organizer at Tozen Union, while Louis Carlet is general secretary and founder.
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Presentations from 2015

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December 20, 2015 (SUNDAY): My Share and End-of-Year Party

Time: 1pm-16:30pm, followed by Bonenkai in the nearby Mexican restuarant

Location: Yokohama Youth Centre (Dai1Kenshusitsu), under Kannai Hall (directions)

Details: If you would like to present, please prepare a 10-15 minute presentation on a practical teaching topic – an activity, some materials, an app or website – anything other members might find useful. To book a slot, please email yojaltpresident@yojalt.org with a 50-100 word abstract and a title. If there is time at the end, it may be possible to squeeze in a few walk-in speakers, but to avoid disappointment please reserve early. After the meeting, we will head out in the area for some food and drink!

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October 18, 2015 (SUNDAY): Extensive Reading

Presenters: Mark Brierley and Peter Hourdequin
Time: 1pm-5pm
Venue: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan Dai2 Kenshushitsu(第二研修室)(1F). Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko) MAP

ER Communities of Practice in Context – Peter Hourdequin
Abstract:This presentation and workshop session will explore individual and contextual factors that drive the formation and maintenance of Extensive Reading (ER) Communities of Practice. After a brief introduction of communities of practice theory and an exploration of contextual factors informing foreign language literacy in Japan, I’ll describe one particular higher education setting’s ER community of practice. I’ll then offer a conceptual framework for assessing factors that influence the success of this community and its members. Participants will use this framework to discuss existing and/or potential ER communities of practice in the contexts where they teach with a focus on creating greater student investment in ER.

 

Getting assessment out of ER without putting it in – Mark Brierley

Abstract: One of Richard Day and Julian Bamford’s top ten principles for Extensive Reading (ER) suggests that there should be no testing. However, most teachers are required by their institutions to submit grades, and many face students who would not be there without a grade as an incentive. This presentation will look at the theory and practice of ER assessment, advocating a strategic range of approaches with special consideration for backwash and formative assessment, so that students are motivated to read a lot.

September 20, 2015 (SUNDAY): Bilingualism SIG event

Presenters: Mary Nobuoka and Marybeth Kamibeppu
Time: 1pm-4.30pm
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map
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What You Need to Know about Raising Children to Be Bilingual – Mary Nobuoka

Abstract:Many people think that children raised by parents who speak two or more languages will naturally become bilingual or multilingual. However, in a monolingual country, this is not so easy. Raising a bilingual child in Japan (or countries like the USA) requires planning and attention. This presentation will alert parents to the challenges of raising a bilingual child and share the factors for success. Tips for adding bi-literacy skills will also be included. This talk will be of benefit to any family that is hoping their child(ren) will be bilingual.

Let’s Talk “Juken” – Marybeth Kamibeppu

Abstract:This presentation will introduce basic terms and practices for junior high and high school entrance exams (juken) in the Kanto Area. Understanding the juken process is a daunting prospect that most students and parents will face. This is even more so for international and bicultural families who less familiar with the Japanese education system. Parents have an active role to support and guide their children. Juken is more that getting into the “best” school. It is about finding the best fit for each child. There are many factors and with adolescents the “best fit” is often a moving target. Bicultural and bilingual abilities can be a plus in the process. How to prepare and document these abilities and experiences will be discussed. Preparation and strategies based on the presenter’s experience getting through the process with her own three children, informal interviews with other parents and research will be included. If you are just starting out, in the process of juken or would like to share some advice, join us and let’s talk juken!
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June 28, 2015 (SUNDAY): Speech, Drama and Debate Mini-Conference (ALL DAY EVENT)

Time: Probably around 9.15/9.30 until around 6pm
Location: Keio University, Hiyoshi campus (right next to Toyoko line Hiyoshi station) – Google Map.
Daikaigishitsu (大会議室), Raiosha building 2F. Directly across from the library/media centre Campus Map.

Details:
On Sunday, June 28, the Yokohama Chapter and the Speech, Drama, & Debate SIG will present a full day mini-conference, “A Day with the Speech, Drama, & Debate SIG in Yokohama,” with 9 speakers giving presentations and workshops on speech, drama, and debate.

SCHEDULE

9:15 Registration Opens
10:00-10:10 Opening Remarks
10:15-11:10 “Teaching Storytelling through Integrated Course and Assessment Design” (Roy Morris)
11:15-12:15 “Adapting Drama to the Everyday Class” (Eucharia Donnery)

12:15-1:00 LUNCH

1:00-1:25 “Integrating Drama into Required English Communication Courses” (Gordon Rees)
1:25-2:25 “Improvisation Games for Language Classes (Vivian Bussinguer-Khavari and Gordon Rees)

2:30-3:30 “Docudrama: The Combination of Documentary, Discussion, and Drama” (Yukari Saiki)

3:30-3:45 BREAK

3:45-4:10 “Assessment for Presentations” (Brooks Slaybaugh)
4:15- 4:40 “Drama in Project-based Learning” (James Carpenter)
4:45-5:10 “Speech: Preparation Methods and Teaching Topics” (Paul Nehls)
5:15-5:40 “Debate Made Easy” (David Kluge)
5:45-6:00 Closing Remarks
6:00- Dinner

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May 30, 2015 (SATURDAY): Tech My Share @ Tamagawa

Time: From 1pm, until we run out of presentations!

Location: Tamagawa University, Building 5, Room 431 (level 4).
Near Tamagawagakuen-Mae station (exit 1), one stop from Machida on Odakyu line.
If you come before 1pm, there will be people stationed along the way to help you find the room.

The call for presentations is now closed, but there may be time to squeeze in a few walk-in speakers at the end. After the meeting, we will head out in the area for some food and drink!

As with the December MyShare, there will be the opportunity to publish a related article. The tentative plan this time is to team up with Accents Asia.

Presentations so far
1) Mary Nobuoka – Creating reusable pronunciation pairs on Keynote
2) David Ockert – Using a tablet computer for positive self-review
3) Paul Raine – Quiz Vid: Create and administer comprehension quizzes for YouTube videos
4) Malc Prentice – Automated progress reports for vocabulary and quickwrites.
5) Selinda England – An Introduction to Flipped Learning
6) Dan Ferreira – What do you do to overcome writer’s block?
7) Euan Bonner – Using Google Sheets to Make Online Quizzes Without Any Spreadsheet Knowledge
8) Michelangelo Magasic – Learning through watching: How to use Movieclips.com as an effective learning tool
9) Matthew Keighley – Scannable, Evernote, and Goodnotes – Building a digital writing habit
10) Cecilia Fujishima Building language awareness and reflection through voice recording
11) You! If we have time at the end of the session, there will be a chance for any audience members to share an idea.

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May 23, 2015 (SATURDAY): Dinner with Dr. Liliana Landolfi

Date: Saturday May 23
Time: From 4.30pm

As part of the Pan-SIG conference, one of the plenary speakers – Dr Liliana Landolfi – will be touring the country to speak at chapters. At Yokohama, we have invited Dr Landolfi along for another of our “dinner with” events. If you have time, please come along and join us for an evening of food, drink, and interesting language-learning themed discussion following a very short lecture.

Bio: Liliana Landolfi, Ph.D. (in Applied Linguistics at U.S.C Los Angeles, CA.), is a Professor of English Language and Linguistics at the University of Naples, L’Orientale, Italy. She is the author of several books and essays on SLA, ESL/EFL methodology, affect, teacher-training, CALL, NLP, CLIL, and more.

The Plan

1) Saturday May 23, at around 4.30pm, meet for Introductions and pre-dinner drinks at the Baird Taproom Bashamichi

The Bashamichi Taproom is minutes from Sakuragicho, Kannai, and Bashamichi, near our Kannai Hall venue
Map: http://bairdbeer.com/en/tap/bashamichi.html

2) At 5pm, move to the (very quiet) Mexican restaurant “Esperanza”

If you’re coming later, it is just across the road, facing the Taproom

3) 20 minute lecture by Dr Landolfi

Topic: Her work on emotion in language learning, including insights emerging from the P.Æ.C.E. corpus (Landolfi 2012a).
Drinks only, as constantly arriving plates of sizzling fajitas may distract

4) Food and discussion.

Escape before the mariachi guitar starts playing and makes conversation impossible at around 8pm.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Malc (yojaltpresident@yojalt.org) before May 5th
If you get lost, call 08054781495

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February 21, 2015 (SATURDAY): Weaving Nation’s Four Strands into a Syllabus

Presenter: Terry Yearley
Time: 15:30-18:30

Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)

Details: This presentation will focus on the practical application of Nation’s book ‘What Should Every EFL Teacher Know?’ for syllabus design. I will begin by describing the four strands (meaning-focused input, meaning-focused output, language-focused learning, and fluency development), and their roles in a syllabus. Next, I will describe my own teaching situation, and then explain how I used this model to design a syllabus for my second grade senior high school students. I will include some of the problems I encountered, and some unexpected occurrences. To conclude, teachers will be invited to take part in an open discussion of their experiences regarding syllabus design.

Bio: Terry Yearley teaches EFL to first and second grade students at Keio Senior High School.

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January 18, 2015 (SUNDAY): Listening and Speaking in Secondary School

Time: 1pm-4.30pm
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map
Abstracts

Oral Introduction by Mariko Fujita : Oral Introduction, a teaching method which is widely used in Japan, will be the focus of my talk. First, I’ll briefly talk about how Oral Introduction got started in Japan. Then, I’ll talk about how it is usually used in junior and senior high schools in Japan and its advantage and disadvantages. Next, I’ll demonstrate how I use it in my class. I may ask the audience to participate in that activity. Finally, I’ll talk about how I used it in teacher training at university and the reaction of my students.

Activities for Listening and Speaking in Small Talk by Ethel Ogane: Some disregard small talk and refer to it as unimportant talk. To Malinowski small talk was phatic communion, merely talk for social bonding, but studies on small talk show that it serves many transactional and relational functions. Methodologically, small talk is the norm to which other talk, in specialist, professional contexts like doctor to patient, is compared. In addition, research also shows what it achieves for participants interactionally. It is an important skill to learn for students who may be entering professional or service industries. In this workshop, participants will join in activities used to help students with the topics, openings, strategies, and closings used in everyday talk.

Biographies
Mariko Fujita holds an MA in TESOL from Teachers College Columbia University, and an EdD in TESOL from Temple University. She is a full-time teacher at Keio Shonan Fujisawa High School and also teaches TESOL at Keio University. Her research interests include bilingualism and teacher training.

Ethel Ogane, EdD, is a professor in the College of Tourism and Hospitality at Tamagawa University. Her research interests include teacher education, motivation and autonomy in language learning, and the ELF model and language curriculum development. ethel@bus.tamagawa.ac.jp

Presentations from 2014

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December 20 (SATURDAY): My Share and End-of-Year Party

Time: 1.30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Details: If you would like to present, please prepare a 10-15 minute presentation on a practical teaching topic – an activity, some materials, an app or website – anything other members might find useful. To book a slot, please email yojaltpresident@yojalt.org with a 50-100 word abstract and a title. If there is time at the end, it may be possible to squeeze in a few walk-in speakers, but to avoid disappointment please reserve early. After the meeting, we will head out in the area for some food and drink!

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October 18, 2014 (SATURDAY): Conversation Activities + Elections and AGM

Time: 3.30pm-6.30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)
Details:

1) Sean Anderson: Question Quest : The Language Card Game

Sean will present on Question Quest, a card=based conversation activity he has published.

Abstract: Most teachers that try to retro-fit an existing card game like Go-fish or Crazy-Eights into a language learning game have subpar results. Students must be prodded into producing target structures and reminded to not play the game in Japanese. Also their English level rarely determines victory.
Question Quest is the solution to these problems. Question Quest wasn’t built on the rules of an existing card game, but on the rules of conversation! Come and join Sean Anderson as he introduces you to this amazing new resource, so you can put your students’ language skills to the Quest!
Bio: Sean Anderson, a teacher for fifteen years, came to Japan in 1999 and has taught students at the elementary, high school, and university level. He is Co-founder of Quest Maker Media, currently teaches at Senzoku Gakuen High School, and is the inventor of Question Quest : The Language Card Game.

2) Nathaniel French: 10 minute free conversations

Abstract: This presentation will outline the activities used to get all 22 of the students in a first year university class (~400 TOEIC) to go from guided conversations that lasted less than a minute to 10 minute free conversations within the span of one semester. The activities used involved (1) Variable Sentence Response (VSR), a type of choose your own adventure for a specific conversational situation, and (2) a variety of uses for 10 single-word conversation cards (such as Who? What? Where?). Upon request, showing/playing any of the 22 recorded 10 minute free conversations from this class is also an option.

Bio: Nathaniel French is the Coordinator for the Materials Writers SIG and a lecturer at Showa Women’s University, Nihon University, and Tokyo International University. He is highly interested in getting students to not only enjoy speaking in English, but to give them the skills and confidence necessary to take their language abilities out into the world.

3) “My Worksheet Share”

If you come to this event, please consider bringing 20 copies of your favourite worksheet – either something you made yourself, or your favourite activity from a photocopiable resource book. Depending on the timing, we can either a) just swap them and ask questions (if there are any) at the social, or there may be time to do short 2-3 minute presentations on why you like them, and how to use them.
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September 20, 2014 (SATURDAY): Technology in Language Teaching event

Time: 1pm~

Location: Tamagawa University, Building 5 Room 424 (level four room #424).
Near Tamagawagakuen-Mae station (exit 1), one stop from Machida on Odakyu line.

Details:
Close to 100% of tertiary students in Japan now have a mobile device and most schools have wireless Internet capabilities, so how can language teachers capitalise on these conditions? This workshop style event will feature presentations from members of JALT CALL SIG and contributors to Digital Mobile Language Learning (http://dmll.jaltcall.org), a collection of online publications for teaching and learning languages using technology.
Presenters and presentations include:

-Paul Raine – apps4efl

-Simeon Flowers- LINE BAND

-Travis Cote- Use of smart-phone video

-Brett Milliner & Paul Raine- SurveyMonkey versus Google Forms

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August 2014: No Event

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July 19 (SATURDAY): Exploring the value of student self-transcription

Time: 1.30pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)

Details: Students transcribing their own spoken output (i.e. self-transcription) is a teaching tools that has been sparingly investigated in recent years. With the advancement of technology, however, self-transcription has become easier to administer. In this workshop, Simon Cooke and Colin Skeates will share research into their use of self-transcription in the classroom. In addition, attendees will have a chance to try self-transcription and participate in a discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of using self-transcription in their own teaching context. As cell phones will be used during the workshop, please ensure that your phone has recently been charged before you attend.
Materials: Download PPT

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June 21 (SATURDAY): Daniela Papi – Voluntourism

Time: 2pm~
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)

Details: If you are thinking about taking students abroad on a service trip or bringing the world into your classroom virtually through development education, please join us for this workshop and discussion by Daniela Papi! As an ex-JET and founder of PEPY Cambodia, Daniela will share lessons, tips, tools, and stories from the six years she lived in Cambodia and reflect on both the positive and negative effects she saw of the growing volunteer travel sector. You should walk away with ideas for how to avoid contributing to the volunteer travel horror stories and tips for how to bring development education into the classroom without needing to leave home.

In association with the Global Issues in Language Education (GILE) SIG
Bio: While working as an English teacher in Shizuoka-ken, Japan, Daniela Papi organized a bike trip across Cambodia to build a school. That trip led Daniela to spend six years in Cambodia where she founded a youth leadership and education organization, PEPY, a development education travel company PEPY Tours, and an education and advocacy organization committed to helping people rethink volunteer travel, “Learning Service”.

Handout: Development Education Resource List
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May 17 (Saturday): Raising Gender Awareness in the EFL Community in Japan: A closer examination of gender in the classroom and in the workplace.

Time: 1pm~4.45pm
Location: Kanagawa chiku centre(横浜市神奈川地区センター) –
Directions: 5 mins from JR Higashi-Kanagawa station. Map Link
– Go out the back, past Keikyu Nakakido. Turn right at the 7-11, and it’s down that street on the left, just past the park (Google Street View)

Details: Many people are under the misguided perception that gender issues belong exclusively within the realm of “women” and are not of importance or of interest to men. This panel of GALE members, aims to correct this illusion by presenting gender based topics about teaching methodology, beliefs and professional lives, which can be of use and interest to both a female and a male audience.

Kristie Collins will share her experiences about teaching “Media & Gender” and “Introduction to Gender Studies” courses to Japanese and International students at the University of Tsukuba. Her presentation will include a number of informative activities for “Media & Gender” lessons for learners of various ages and language levels and participants will be introduced to a variety of gender studies resources for their future pedagogical consideration. Reiko Yoshihara will present on feminist EFL teachers’ teaching practices and beliefs. Diane Nagatomo will present the results of her ongoing research, which examines gender issues that shape the professional identities of foreign female university teachers in Japan. The afternoon will conclude with discussion break-outs and a question and answer session.
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April 20 (SUNDAY!): “My Question”

Time: 2pm This event is on a SUNDAY
Location: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan Dai2 Kenshushitsu(第二研修室)(1F). Near Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko)
Details: Our April event this year will follow a new format – “My Question”. The idea is that everyone who comes should think of a question or two that they would like to ask the group. This could be a straightforward factual question, a request for suggestions/advice, or a discussion starter. For example:

Teaching advice
– How do you handle plagiarism?
– Do you teach pronunciation? How?
– What writing errors do you think we should correct?

Career advice
– I’m writing a Japanese CV, but I don’t know what to put in this section here.
– What kind of questions did you get at your job interviews for a university position?
– What job websites are best?

Admin advice
– Has anyone set up a graded reader library without school funding?
– My teaching group shares a lot of worksheets/materials, but sharing by email is getting fiddly. Is there a better way?
– Some of the teachers I supervise don’t use the assigned textbooks. Students are complaining. What should I do?

Research/Publishing Advice
– How do I choose a journal to publish in?
– I want to do a quantitative project, but I don’t know statistics. Where can I learn?
– What’s the best way to analyse interview data?

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May 17 (Saturday): Raising Gender Awareness in the EFL Community in Japan: A closer examination of gender in the classroom and in the workplace.

Time: 1pm~4.45pm
Location: Kanagawa chiku centre(横浜市神奈川地区センター) –
Directions: 5 mins from JR Higashi Kanagawa station. Map Link
– Go out the back, past Keikyu Nakakido. Turn right at the 7-11, and it’s down that street on the left, just past the park (Google Street View)

Details: Many people are under the misguided perception that gender issues belong exclusively within the realm of “women” and are not of importance or of interest to men. This panel of GALE members, aims to correct this illusion by presenting gender based topics about teaching methodology, beliefs and professional lives, which can be of use and interest to both a female and a male audience.

Kristie Collins will share her experiences about teaching “Media & Gender” and “Introduction to Gender Studies” courses to Japanese and International students at the University of Tsukuba. Her presentation will include a number of informative activities for “Media & Gender” lessons for learners of various ages and language levels and participants will be introduced to a variety of gender studies resources for their future pedagogical consideration. Reiko Yoshihara will present on feminist EFL teachers’ teaching practices and beliefs. Diane Nagatomo will present the results of her ongoing research, which examines gender issues that shape the professional identities of foreign female university teachers in Japan. The afternoon will conclude with discussion break-outs and a question and answer session.
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March 29 (Saturday): Hanami!

Time: 2pm
Location: Mitsuike Koen, the only Hanami spot in Yokohama that makes the Japan Cherry Blossom Association’s “100 best” list.
Directions: Nearest station is Tsurumi 鶴見 (JR Keihin-Tohoku), although there is also Keikyu Tsurumi just behind it. From the West Exit, take Shi-ei bus 市営バス 6, 67 or 104 destination Kajiyama 梶山 or Shin-Yokohama 新横浜. Get off at Mitsuike-koen Kita-mon (north gate) 三ツ池公園北門.

UPDATE TO DIRECTIONS. COuldn’t find the buses mentioned in previous information. They might exist, but the conductor at the station said “Take any bus from Tsurumi west exit bus station stop 6 or 7 and get off at Teraochugaku iriguchi stop”. From there, you go up to main road and turn right. 3mins down the road past a post office and a HS, turn left at traffic lights. You’ll see it. Watch out for the sign to Mitsuike Park that tells you which street NOT to go down. Basically, follow the people with bags full of snacks!.

LOCATION IN PARK: We are at the back of the park, where the decent flowers are. Past the third lake, past the kids’ slide, on the left near the rock garden river thing. Call Malc on 08054781495 if you’re lost.
Google Maps pin: http://goo.gl/maps/GfnOO

Details: Friends and family more than welcome. Don’t forget your groundsheet!

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CANCELLEDFebruary 15: Technology in Language Teaching event

Time: 1pm-4.45pm

Location: Tamagawa University, Building 5 Room 424 (level four room #424).
Near Tamagawagakuen-Mae station (exit 1), one stop from Machida on Odakyu line.

Details: Close to 100% of tertiary students in Japan now have a mobile device and most schools have wireless Internet capabilities, so how can language teachers capitalise on these conditions? This workshop style event will feature presentations from the chief editor and contributors to Digital Mobile Language Learning (http://dmll.jaltcall.org), a collection of online publications for teaching and learning languages using technology. Presenters and presentations include:

  • Kevin Ryan- Project Based Learning (PBL) and Badges for class management
  • Dan Ferreira- Digital Literacies
  • Simeon Flowers- LINE BAND
  • Travis Cote- Use of smart-phone video
  • Brett Milliner- How to use SurveyMonkey

 

There will also be opportunities for discussion and questions concerning technological issues teachers are facing in their language classroom.

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January 18 – “Cooperative learning: teaching that is as easy as 1-2-3-4″ by Joël Laurier

Time: 1pm-4.45pm
Location: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall (directions)

Abstract:Current reforms in the educational landscape are pushing toward a more student-centered approach to education. The talk is now of learning more than teaching. Cooperative Learning (CL) is a research based teaching pedagogy that provides an effective teaching approach, especially in language learning. Through interactive, task based activities, students learn to take control of their own learning. By making students the center of learning, the role of the teacher becomes that of a facilitator, reducing the need to rely on teacher-centered presentations. The classroom then becomes a place where students and teachers work together to create meaningful and fulfilling learning experiences. This hands on workshop will show how attendees how they can use CL to increase active participation between students, build confidence for teachers, and deliver more student-centered English lessons. Attendees will be shown effective CL structures that make learning the student’s responsibility and facilitating the teacher’s concern.’

Bio: Joël Laurier is a teacher at Gunma Kokusai Academy. He is a 2013 Kagan Academy Cooperative Learning Scholarship winner and the 2011 John F. Fanselow Scholarship recipient from Teachers College Columbia University, where he received his MA in TESOL. His research interests include language policy and bilingualism but he is best known for his cooperative learning training. Along with his son, Noah, Mr. Laurier is the voice and face of the award-winning Yomiuri Kodomo Shinbum’s Hello Eikaiwa weekly feature. waldolaurier@gmail.com
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Presentations from 2013

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December 21 – My Share and End-of-year party

Time: 1pm-4.45pm
Location: Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan Dai2 Kenshushitsu(第二研修室)(1F). Ten mins from Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko)
Directions: MAP
Details: Calls open for 10-20 minute practical presentations. In association with the Saitama City Educators. Presenters will have the opportunity to submit an article about their presentation to the Saitama City Educators Journal
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November 16 – Negotiating the discipline: Writing for publication in TEFL/TESL by Theron Muller

Time: 1pm-4pm
Location: Meeting room 1 (第一会議室), Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Ten mins from Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko)
Directions: MAP
Abstract: This two part interactive workshop will first discuss the practices of teacher-researchers writing for academic publication, considering obstacles encountered and strategies for successfully overcoming those obstacles. The second part will examine examples of the process of negotiating publication, discussing samples of writing submitted for review alongside the comments of editors and reviewers. Discussion will center around how manuscripts require transformation through dialog with academic reviewers and editors. Participants interested in preparing their own manuscripts for publication will learn more about the process they should expect their papers to undergo and how to go about selecting potential publications for their work.
Bio: Theron Muller, University of Toyama, is a teacher and researcher based in Japan. He is lead editor of Innovating EFL Teaching in Asia, Palgrave Macmillan, and teaches the online MASH Academic Publishing course. He is interested in academic publishing research and TEFL/TESL classroom-based research.
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October 29 (Tuesday) – Rubina Khan – Learner Autonomy: An Emergent Praxis in Language Education in Bangladesh

Time: 7pm-8.30pm, followed by dinner
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map
Abstract: This paper examines language pedagogy in a developing context within a post modernist framework. Moving away from traditional practices fed by a transmissive view of learning, a pathway into more progressive ways is explored through a small-scale study on tertiary level students’ engagement with autonomous learning. After discussing the study findings, the paper moves on to discuss the question: Is it conclusive to believe that interesting tasks and self-directed learning go hand in hand? Does the emergence of multiple sources of second language stimuli improve language development? To get to grips with these questions, the paper draws on the cognitive concepts of attitude and motivation and the role that agency plays in the learning process.

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October 31 (Thursday) – Penny Ur – Getting them to talk in English

(In association with CUE)

Time: 7pm-8.30pm, followed by dinner
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map
Abstract: It is always a problem getting students to talk informally in English: however interesting the topic we suggest, they often prefer to keep silent, or to express themselves their mother tongue. This talk suggests a few guidelines that will go some way towards solving these problems, illustrated by some practical activities intended for students at various levels of proficiency.

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September 21 – Conference Preview

Time: 1pm-4pm
Location:  Meeting Room 2 (第二会議室), Yokohama Kyoiku Kaikan. Ten mins from Sakuragicho (JR/underground) or Hinode (Toyoko)
Directions: MAP
Details:
Travis Cote, Ethel Ogane, Paul McBride, Mitsuko Imai, & Brett Milliner – Orientation for ELF Teachers: Lessons Learned (25 mins)
Abstract: It is the teachers, their personal beliefs and principles, who determine the success of a language program. The orientation meeting is always the first point of induction serving to clarify goals, anticipate problems and identify resources and support networks. The presenters will share lessons learned from the process of familiarizing teachers with a university’s new English as a Lingua Franca program.

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July 20 – Self Access centers

Time: 1pm-4.45pm
Venue: Yokohama Youth Centre, under Kannai Hall
Details: Poster for July 2013 Event

Presenters from universities with active self-access centers (conversational lounges, writing centers, etc.) will speak about what it takes to set up, administer and get your students to effectively use them. Brett Milliner and Travis Cote will present on a tutorial service recently established at Tamagawa University, in particular looking at communication and using data collection to inform decisions. Darrell Wilkinson will present on the conversation, writing and tutorial centers available at Soka University. Bob Morrison from Kanda University of International Studies will describe their self-access centre, its curriculum, advisors, materials and activities, looking at how they can be adapted to participants’ own contexts.

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June 15 (SATURDAY) TOEFL iBT workshop, by Kazuya Kito and Terry Yearley

Time: 1pm-5pm
Location: Yokohama City University Kanazawa Hakkei Campus, near Kanazawa Hakkei station on the Keikyu line – (directions)
Details: Poster for June 2013 Event

We will begin with an overview of the TOEFL iBT including: the origin and purpose of the test, its overall structure, the sequence of the sections, test takers’ probable score requirements, the difference between ‘independent’ and ‘integrated’ tasks, the use of templates, and the use of practice tests.

Kazuya Kito

This TOEFL iBT speaking seminar introduces the general format of the speaking section of the test. From there, the seminar will move on to talk about how the speaking section is rated and scored. Next, details of the speaking rubric will be discussed. The participants will be able to practice each speaking task and will also be asked to rate sample recordings of the tasks. In the latter part of the seminar, participants will do some practice activities in order to get an idea of how to teach TOEFL iBT speaking for their students. Lastly, the seminar will close with questions from the participants.

Bio: Kazuya Kito graduated with an Ms. Ed. TESOL from Temple University, Japan. He has taught TOEFL at national and private universities, and to Japanese business people at learning centers. Recently, he has been teaching speaking and ESP courses at a university in Tokyo.

Terry Yearley

We will begin with an overview of the two writing tasks, and then move on to a look at some of the challenges involved in preparing students to deal with these tasks in the test. We will pay particular attention to the differences involved in writing a summary or essay with a pen and paper compared to with a computer. Finally, we will look at two simple ideas that can help with this.

Bio: Terry Yearley has been teaching Speaking, Writing and Listening for the TOEFL Test since 2004. He regularly attends TOEFL training seminars, and has given several presentations on teachers’ strategies to help prepare students for the test.

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May 18 (SATURDAY) Appreciative Inquiry Activities and Ideal Classmates Research by Tim Murphey

Time: 1.15pm-4.30pm
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map
Abstract: In this presentation, I will briefly describe some research and activities done in the spring of 2012 with 488 students in 4 Japanese universities in the Tokyo area in which they were asked a special question at the end of a long survey: Q39 Please describe a group of classmates that you could learn English well with. What would you all do to help each other learn better and more enjoyably? Our contention is that answering this question, and describing and identifying such characteristics, eventually enabled students to identify with doing these things themselves (what they described for others) that further enabled them to become better classmates and increase their motivation. These results can be understood through the field of Appreciative Inquiry and the Altruistic Turn.Students’ open-ended answers to the question above were further coded into 16 descriptors and given back to them at midterm asking them to respond to three likert scale questions for each descriptor.
a. This is important for successful learning.

b. My classmates have done this so far this semester.

c. I have done this so far this semester.

Results show student groups started resonating together and that the distance between their ideal classmates and their actual classmates and themselves was not so far.

Teachers will be given practical ideas for addressing these things in the classroom.

You are welcome to experiment yourself with the survey, go to

Looping Survey Sheet (Please download here. Sorry for the long address.)

http://www3.hp-ez.com/hp/englisheducation/page3

Bio: Tim Murphey (PhD Université de Neuchâtel, Switzerland, in Applied Linguistics) TESOL’s Professional Development in Language Education series editor, co-author with Zoltan Dörnyei of Group Dynamics in the Language Classroom (CUP 2003), author of Music and Song (OUP, 1991), Teaching One to One (Longman 1992), Language Hungry! (Macmillan LanguageHouse/1998; Helbling /2006), Teaching in Pursuit of Wow! (Abax, 2012) and a novel about Japan’s entrance exam system The Tale that Wags (Perceptia, 2010, 2011 in Japanese), presently researches Vygotskian socio-cultural theory (SCT) applications with particular emphasis on student voice, agency, identity, and community construction at Kanda University of International Studies. He teaches graduate school courses in the US, Taiwan, and Japan; publishes books with a dozen publishers, has downloadable teaching videos at the University of Hawai’i NFLRC, also available on YouTube at “Tim Murphey Tips” (Google it!).

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April 20 (SATURDAY) Humor: Theory and Implications for Teaching by Ted Quock

Time: 1pm-5pm
Location: Kanagawa Kokaido Hall – 2 mins walk from JR HigashiKanagawa (Yokohama/Keihin Tohoku line) and Nakakido (Keikyu) – map

Abstract: This workshop takes up the concept of intention vs. perception in humor. It will begin with the role of humor in the classroom, including the teaching of humor as an academic subject and both the intentional and incidental of humor in teaching. The focus will then move on to a definition of basic terms, beginning with humor itself. Among the topics and issues that will arise are reactions to humor, humor density, target audience, and target of humor. Most importantly, the workshop will explore the relationship between intention and perception. The presenter will introduce various humorous materials and situations, and the presentation will include an analysis of selected editorial cartoons and original artwork relating to the events and aftermath of March 11, 2011, in the Tohoku region. The audience will constantly be involved in discussion of terminology and issues, and offering reactions to the materials introduced.

Presenter bio: Ted Quock has been teaching in Japan since 1979. His career has included more than 10 years as Program Director of Simul Academy, more than 15 years as an adjunct professor at Columbia University Teachers College Japan (MATESOL Program) and the University of Tokyo. He is currently a professor of English Communication at Keisen University. While he has written and edited a variety of teaching materials, he is most interested in the use of authentic materials and humor in teaching.Link to Poster
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February 2013: Applying Principles of Social Psychology for Better Classroom Management

by Leander Hughes

Time: 1pm-5pm
Venue: Kannai Hall

Abstract: Whether or not your context is management-intensive, as an educator, you know there are times when it is crucial to help your students make certain choices about their learning. This presentation introduces several principles from social psychology which can help you help your students make the right choices about how they spend their time in your class. Some of the concepts we will be working with include the roles of priming, anchoring, and relativity in decision-making, as well as the principles of persuasion known as social proof and commitment/consistency. During the presentation, you may find that you have already effectively applied some of these principles in your classes without even being aware of it. Becoming more aware of these principles will help you employ them to even greater effect. After introducing each principle, we will share our experiences and ideas on how we have applied it or hope to apply it in our contexts.

Presenter Bio: Leander Hughes is an assistant professor at the Saitama University Center for English Education and Development. He is interested in quantitative language research methods and in applying findings in current social psychology to the language learning context. His other interests include computer assisted language
learning, learner autonomy, and communicative task effectiveness.
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January 19th  2013 (SATURDAY!) – Enhancing Students’ Motivation: Imagining an L2 Self

by Garold Murray

Time: 1pm-5pm
Location: Kannai Hall (directions)
Details: Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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Presentations from 2012

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December 16th – My Share and Bonenkai.

Time: 1:00pm until 5pm (for My Share)
Location: Kannai Hall (directions)
Details: Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 
Materials for download: PDF of Dan Ferreira’s slides
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November 18th – Teachers Helping Teachers (5 speakers)

Time: 10.30 am – 4pm
Location: Kanagawa University, Yokohama Campus (directions), Building 20, second floor, room 207. A “walking bus” guided group will be leaving Hakuraku station at 10.10
Details:Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 
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October 21st – Critical Media Literacy & Global Issues in Scholarly Writing: Towards Academic Publication

with Anna Husson Isozaki and Atsushi Iida

Time: 1:00pm until 5pm.
Location: Yokohama City University (directions)
Details:Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 
LINK FOR MATERIALS FOR Critical Media Literacy with Anna Husson Isozaki
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September 23rd – Action Research

with Robert Croker

Time: All day event.
Location: Yokohama City University (directions)
Details:Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 
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July 15th – Practical Ideas for Teaching Pronunciation

with Ayako Kanamaru and Chie Shiramizu, and Terry Yearley

Time: 1:00pm until 4:45pm.
Location: Kannai Hall (directions)
Details: Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 
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June 17, 2012 (Kannai Hall)

A Task-Based University Semester Project by Tanya Erdelyi
The Potential Benefits of Using Music Videos in the EFL Classroom by Andy Roomy
Fluency activity 3-2-1 by Katsuya Yokomoto

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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May 20, 2012 (Kannai Hall)

From Phonics to Literacy by Brad Semans
Teaching Critical Thinking Skills by John Finucane

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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April 22, 2012 (Yokohama CIty University)

Teaching Older Learners by Tadashi Ishida

&

English Rakugo by Tatsuya Sudo

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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February 19, 2012 (Kanagawa University)
Cross-cultural Pragmatics & Communicative Competence

by Megumi Kawate-Mierzejewska

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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January 15, 2012 (Kannai)
Content Based Language Learning

by Mike Guest

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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Presentations from 2011

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December 2011 (Kannai Hall)
My Share

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October 2011 (YCU)
Using Conflict Resolution Techniques for Language Learning

by Chris Stillwell

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September 2011 – National rehearsals.

Language Policy in Japan: Shifting Paradigms

Michael Mondejar, Joël Laurier, Bill Mboutsiadis, Linamaria Valdivia, and Edward Sanchez

&

The Dogme ELT approach, benefits for both teacher and learner.

Carol Begg

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July 2011 – Improve Memory & Learning: 5 Powerful Teaching Techniques for EFL Classrooms

Robert Murphy

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June 2011 – Nakasendo

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May 2011 – Critical Thinking

David Gann / Jennie Roloff / Hugh Graham-Marr

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April 2011 – Columbia University Teachers College Writing Center

Jennie Roloff / Robert Moreau / Peter Cassidy

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February 2011 – TOEFL Integrated Writing

Terry Yearley, Alastair Graham-Marr, Micheal Ringen

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January 2011 – Technology in the Classroom

Mary Nobuoka and Darren Elliott

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Presentations from 2010

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December 2010 – Social

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October 2010 – Homework

Teruko Nakajima, John Spiri and Gota Hayashi

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Saturday, July 17th 2010 – Vocabulary Conference

Rob Waring, Phillip Brown, Rory Rosszel

Place: Kanto Gakuin University Kannai Media Center, near JR Kannai
Time: Doors open 10:15 am / start 10:30 am / Finish 3:35 pm / Doors close 4:00
Presentations:
Factors in second language acquisition: opportunity, exposure, uptake and retention – Rob Waring (10:30 am – 11:45 am)
Word up! Vocabulary Learning Strategies Empowerment – Philip Shigeo Brown (12:45 pm -1:45 pm)
Helping learners to develop their vocabulary: How can dictionaries help? – Rory Rosszell (2:35 pm – 3:35)

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May 2010 – “Motivation”

Rob Moreau & Allen Lindskoog; Polina Mitkova and David Beglar

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February 2010 – “Task Based Language Teaching”

Eric Setoguchi, Sean Izumi, Naoko Michizuki and Joachim Castellano

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January 2010 – “Extensive Reading”

Jennifer Yphantides and David Williams

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Presentations from 2009

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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March 2009 – “Action Research project part 2″

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February 2009 – “Action Research project part 1″

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Presentations from 2008

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December 2008 – My Share and End of year Party

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September 2008 – YoJALT SIG BASH

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July, 2008: “Hurt Your Brain”

Jack Curran and Colin Skeates

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May, 2008 – Re-Launch of YoJALT: Yokohama meet JALT – JALT meet Yokohama

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June, 2008 – Social in Yokohama Watami

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Presentations from 2007

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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July, 2007 – “Teaching Yoga to Children through English”

Elizabeth Knight

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May, 2007 – “Brazilian or Japanese: choosing the best education”

Toshiko Sugino

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April, 2007 “Teaching Micro-Skills for the TOEFL iBT Speaking Tasks and Integrated Writing”

Terry Yearley

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March, 2007 – “Imparting Language Skills and Critical Thinking Habits through Teaching Academic Writing”

Ron Thornton

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February, 2007 – “Discourse, Teaching and Video-Journaling”

by Colin Skeates

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January, 2007 – “Word Association and the Mental Lexicon”

by Philip Shigeo Brown

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Presentations from 2006

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December, 2006 – “Hyper Reading”

by Matt Sparling

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November, 2006 –

Blogs as a Teacher Research Tool

by Renata Suzuki

+

Teaching Comparative Religion

by Jean-Paul DuQuette.

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October, 2006 -“The Song of Myself: Haiku in the EFL Classroom”

by Trudie Heiman

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September, 2006 – “Toybox, Music box: Teaching Young and Special Needs Learners with classical music, toys, and Mexican music”

by Francisco Sanchez

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July, 2006 – “Teaching English to Older Learners”

by Tadashi Ishida

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June, 2006 – “Practical Pragmatics: Teaching Speech Acts in EFL Classrooms”

by Toshihiko Suzuki

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May, 2006 – “Making a Small-class Atmosphere in Big University Classes”

by Theron Muller

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April, 2006 – “NLP and Feldenkrais: Body and Mind in the Classroom”

by Sylive Kuehne

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March, 2006 – “Fun activities with Junior and Senior-High Learners”

by Jonathan Robinson

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February, 2006 – “Content-Based Instruction Workshop: Windows on Teaching Young Learners”

by Mitsue Allen-Tamai

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January, 2006 – “Why do Students Lose their Motivation?”

by Kiwa Arai

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Presentations from 2005

Details for all presentations prior to 2013 are now downloadable in a single 6MB ZIP file. 

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December 2005 – “Introducing Self-directed Learning to College Students”

by Marc Sheffner

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November, 2005 – “VEN: Sustainable English teacher development in Southeast Asia”

by Roger Pattimore

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October, 2005 – “One Green Leaf: Ecosongs and Activities for Kids”

by Renata Suzuki

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